Net neutrality gone, and it’s up to people to talk back

“The Devil will be in the details” of the new FCC rules. Once a long-neutral arena where ownership didn’t apply any more than a boat out at sea applied to a certain country because it was in international waters, the Internet can now be privately owned and peoples’ voices like yours and mine can be drowned out by the masters of the electronic universe. 

The FCC issued a statement this morning that claims that the new network neutrality proposal will not allow ISPs to, “act in a commercially unreasonable manner to harm the Internet, including favoring the traffic from an affiliated entity.”  But we have no idea as to how “commercially reasonable” will actually be interpreted.

 

The devil will be in the details. While all we have now is a statement that a proposal for what the proposed rules might look like is being circulated in private within the FCC, the public should be poised to act. In an FCC rulemaking process, the commission issues what’s called a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM).

 

After the NPRM is issued, the public is invited to comment to the FCC about how their proposal will affect the interest of the public.

 

 

 

The FCC is required by law to respond to public comments, so it’s extremely important that we let the FCC know that rules that let ISPs pick and choose how certain companies reach consumers will not be tolerated. 

The problem is that most people don’t know about this extremely opaque process, and so they don’t participate.  Let’s change that. Stay tuned. We’ll let you know when it’s time to raise your voice and add your testimony during the FCC’s public comment window when the new proposed rules are announced.

 

–Electronic Frontier Foundation post on the FCC’s new rules.

 

 

 

 

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